7 Must Haves For Traveling with Babies & Toddlers

I did the math the other day, the twins, at almost 18 months, have been on 28 flights.  I’d like to say I’ve become this traveling expert and that I could guarantee you a smooth and peaceful flight but then I’d be lying.  I’ve had flights where everything went perfect, and yet the 28th flight was probably the worst one of them all.  That being said, I have compiled a list of 7 things that will give you your best odds at a successful trip.

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A few thoughts before you book.  Typically when I book I’m looking at price. But If I have some flexibility I would consider two things.

First would be getting your toddler their own seat, even if they qualify as a lap baby (under 2).  Having the extra space for your little one to sit, stretch, and stand makes a world of a difference.  Lots of people recommend bringing your car seat, and I might be inclined if that didn’t mean carrying two giant car seats with me through security and the airport along with everything else I already have.  That is just not possible for me.  If you are flying an airline with assigned seating you can request to be moved next to an empty seat, if there is one. Most airlines are accommodating and this gives you extra room at no cost.  However, if it’s a full flight, you are out of luck.

Second would be the time of your flight.  If you pick a flight over nap time or bed time, the chances of your little one sleeping through the flight increase.  In this case, don’t forget their favorite blanket or comfort item!

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Ok, on to the must haves.  I would like to specify that my diaper bag is a backpack and I would highly recommend this to anyone.   This is the one I use, and I love it.

1. Snacks.

Seems easy enough. But think it through. Take a variety, and take something special; a treat of some sort.  Here’s my new favorite: smarties.  They are cheap and easy to pack. And I dish them out one at a time, so now that roll of smarties took 10 minutes to eat. Listen, folks, every minute counts when you are at 30,000 feet.  I’m not sure you could ever have too many snacks. But be careful with a cracker-like snack, bags tend to get crushed and then all you are left with are crumbs.  I put our crushable snacks in a portable spill-proof container like this one.

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2. Electronics.  

Whatever your screen-time rules are, throw them out the window. You can pick them back up when you reach your destination.  If you are a Netflix user, you can now download movies on your device and play them without a wifi connection. The twins are currently in a Moana phase, so you better believe I have that on digital download as well.  Amazon has a bunch of toddler headphones that have limited volume for ear protection.  But I’ll warn you, the volume is so limited, it’s a little difficult to hear at times on a noisy plane.

Apart from movies, we like the Fisherprice Apps.  They are free learning games for toddlers with bright colors and music.  Both of my toddlers will sit and play them for a pretty lengthy amount of time.

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3. Extra Essentials.

However many diapers and wipes you think you need in your carry on, bring more.  The last thing you want to deal with is a delayed flight and a shortage of diapers, wipes, or bottles.  Plus I use wipes for everything, dirty bums, sticky fingers, runny noses, and even cleaning tray tables.  Throw some plastic bags in the bottom of your diaper bag in case someone has a blowout.  I find if you plan for the blowout, nothing happens, but that one time you forget extra clothes and supplies… well you know how that story ends.  When the twins were little babies, I’d bring extra white onesies and just throw them away if they were soiled.

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4. Travel Toys.

One thing I always do is to pick up a couple of surprise items for my kids.  These are things that they have never seen before.  Think lightweight and interactive.  Resist the urge to show them everything in your bag.  Give them one item at a time, when they start to fuss, then and only then do you bring out the next one.  If you have to read the same book 100 times, so be it.  Here are some of my favorites for the twins:

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5. Something to Suck.

This is one you will probably hear over and over again: make sure they are sucking when you take off.  And I’ll admit, the first time I flew with the twins they were only 8 weeks old and I was very concerned that their ears would hurt them on take off and landing.  I followed all the advice and gave them a bottle during ascending and descending, even though they had been sleeping.  Now I want to scream at my inexperienced self.  No. No. No.  Never wake a sleeping baby!  Just be prepared if they seem to be in distress.  Nurse them, offer a bottle, or a sucker if they are older.  I’ve only noticed a few times some discomfort and it usually coincided with a head cold or a teething baby.

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6. A layover.

I’m probably the only person who is going to tell you this.  So take your finger off that scroll button and just hear me out! If your flight is longer than 3 hours I would suggest a layover.  I know it makes your travel day longer, and I know you just want to get to where you are going.  BUT you will be surprised what a break will do for your kids and your patience.  I find that letting my kids walk around, stretch their legs, and take in a change of scenery almost completely resets them for the second leg of the journey.

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7. A Tough Skin

This one’s important, because like I mentioned at the beginning: sometimes you can do it all exactly right and they still cry.  My most recent flight was a disaster of epic proportion for my Chase.  He had an allergic reaction to something during our time in Texas that caused him to break out in hives, which in turn meant he hadn’t slept well the night before.  My little guy was over-tired and not feeling well when we boarded our flight out of San Antonio.  There was no combination of snacks and toys that could counter-act how miserable he was,  He pretty much screamed the entire two hours and 18-minute flight  (but who was counting?).  You are going to get the looks, the whispers, the stares and you need to let them roll right past you.  You are doing your best mama, a crying baby isn’t a sign of failure.

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The more you do it, the easier it gets.  For you and for them.  My 7-year-old is completely self-sufficient on an airplane and has been for years.

Don’t miss out on an opportunity to go somewhere new or to visit family because you are worried about flying with your little ones.  What’s the worst that can happen?  The baby cries the whole time? Been there, done that.  When it’s over, it’s over. You still get to where you are going in the end, and you will never see those people on your flight again.  Well, hopefully not!

Adventure on, friends.

XOXO,Holly

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